A behind the scenes documentary for Kool Koala Productions new stop motion short!
The film is due for completion in February 2012.

22nd January 2012

Video with 2 notes

Director of photography Todd Edick is always ready for his close up. In this video he sheds some light on the stop motion shooting process.

Tagged: mmmkool koalakoolkoalastop motionstopmotionlightingpuppetsminiaturesRyersonfilmfilm fest

5th December 2011

Photoset with 3 notes

Photo of the Day:
The Life of the Animator.

Here’s a quick little blurb: Andrew started out very enthusiastic (photo 1), and quickly the reality of stop motion set in (photo 2). Just kidding, he’s loving it! The second photo is a result of the a fore mentioned exporting issues with Dragon Stop Motion, which appear to have been resolved to this date. I, your mysterious Tumblr updater, will be collecting some of the footage today to throw into a Final Cut Pro timeline. I’ll also be doing any required editing (Photoshop, lighting, After Effects) required to clean up the scenes.

Tagged: MMMkoolkoalastop motionFCPeditingphotoshopafter effectslightingdragon stop motion

4th December 2011

Photo with 29 notes

Photo of the Day:Lighting Set Up
We are proud to announce that pre-production has finally ended and shooting has commenced! One thing we have quickly learned is that lighting really is everything. We’ve got two 1000 watt Lowell lights which we are using to light each set. We’ve got a large umbrella on the back to help deflect light back on the set, as well as a smaller umbrella directly in front to help the glare. 1000 watts is a huge amount of light and we certainly don’t need it all, but the intensity has helped create some nice shadows and contrast! When doing a stop motion film we would highly suggest not skimping or forgetting the importance of professional, quality lighting!

Photo of the Day:
Lighting Set Up

We are proud to announce that pre-production has finally ended and shooting has commenced! One thing we have quickly learned is that lighting really is everything. We’ve got two 1000 watt Lowell lights which we are using to light each set. We’ve got a large umbrella on the back to help deflect light back on the set, as well as a smaller umbrella directly in front to help the glare. 1000 watts is a huge amount of light and we certainly don’t need it all, but the intensity has helped create some nice shadows and contrast! When doing a stop motion film we would highly suggest not skimping or forgetting the importance of professional, quality lighting!

Tagged: MMMkoolkoalastopmotionlightinglowellRTAradioandtelevisionpracticumdarkcomedystudentfilm